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Author Topic: Electronic Tuners  (Read 6148 times)

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Offline Steve_W

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #25 on: Dec 08, 2005, 09:01:26 PM »
Well, I carry a tuning fork too but if you're playing with a piano or other non-adjustable instrument that's not calibrated to A440, that won't help you much!  At the last dance my band played I was sure that I was in tune with the piano but later listening to the minidisc recording I'd made, I realized I was slightly out for a good part of the dance.  Like Fiddlegirl I've decided I need a tuning aid on stage so am now in the market for a calibratable pitch-matching tuner like the ones discussed earlier. 

The OT-12 sounds like a great tuner to me but for my purposes it's probably overkill.  I agree that if I wanted a tuner for intonation work this is the one I'd choose.  I realized that since I usually play with pianos or other equally-tempered instruments, I probably actually want a tuner with equal temperament anyway, so can likely get by with the CA-30. -Steve

Offline fiddlegirlLA

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #26 on: Dec 08, 2005, 11:17:58 PM »
I realized that since I usually play with pianos or other equally-tempered instruments, I probably actually want a tuner with equal temperament anyway, so can likely get by with the CA-30. -Steve

You know, that is a good point. I wonder if it's better to have your instrument in tune with itself or to be in tune with the other equally-tempered instruments you're playing with?? Maybe it depends on the style of music you're playing. If you're playing a lot of double-stops, you probably want to make sure you're in tune with yourself...anyone else out there dealt with this?

Andrea

Offline Happy Camper

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #27 on: Dec 09, 2005, 12:54:23 AM »

I have used the Intellitouch tuner for several years on my fiddles and mandolins and think it is great.  No worry of noise in the area since it works simply off vibration for the tuning.  Mine is not the Bare Bones, it lights up so you can see the face in bad lighting which has been a plus many times.

A lot of people I see, use it also for their guitars, but I never did particularly like it for the guitar, may just not have tried it enough, but, for mando or fiddle, I sure like it.

I am sure the others mentioned work quite well also.

Offline wildberry

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #28 on: Dec 09, 2005, 05:05:13 AM »
You know, that is a good point. I wonder if it's better to have your instrument in tune with itself or to be in tune with the other equally-tempered instruments you're playing with?? Maybe it depends on the style of music you're playing. If you're playing a lot of double-stops, you probably want to make sure you're in tune with yourself...anyone else out there dealt with this?

Andrea
Hi Andrea,
     What I discovered is that equally-tempered tuning is not dead on for strings like violin that normally are tuned in perfect fifths....also, I needed a good, accurate tuner for a noisy stage to be plugged in directly from my electric violins and tuned silently.  So I went with the Peterson VS-II Virtual Strobe Tuner....It's digital, has a LARGE display and is programmable while extremely easy to use on stage.  I can now tune at A-440 with all the strings in perfect fifths.  It's so awesome to go from the silent tuning to perfect double stops in a LOUD environment!  But it's pricey though....but at $200,  that is still much cheaper than a very expensive moment destroyed by a less than perfectly tuned electric violin!!!!....Pythagorean tuning is what it's called. 
      With cross tuning, not sure how that works with this tuner, but it's programmable for MANY different tunings or temperaments...And Peterson Strobe tuners have been seen on most pro stages for many years now.

Offline fiddlegirlLA

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #29 on: Dec 09, 2005, 07:14:33 AM »
cool, thanks for the feedback, all. I think I'll go check out ebay!
Andrea

Offline Steve_W

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #30 on: Dec 09, 2005, 09:47:23 PM »
Hi Andrea,
     What I discovered is that equally-tempered tuning is not dead on for strings like violin that normally are tuned in perfect fifths....also, I needed a good, accurate tuner for a noisy stage to be plugged in directly from my electric violins and tuned silently.  So I went with the Peterson VS-II Virtual Strobe Tuner....It's digital, has a LARGE display and is programmable while extremely easy to use on stage.  I can now tune at A-440 with all the strings in perfect fifths.  It's so awesome to go from the silent tuning to perfect double stops in a LOUD environment!

The question remains, when you tune to just intonation, can you hear a difference in the open strings when playing with an equally-tempered instrument? -Steve

Offline apollonike

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #31 on: Dec 09, 2005, 11:34:08 PM »
Yes.

Offline Nox

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #32 on: Dec 16, 2005, 01:59:06 AM »
Well, the IntelliTouch tuner has been great for my violin...no regrets whatsoever, use it all the time...but I'm still looking for a regular one that will tell me what note I'm playing when I'm up in the E string strasiphere...

...to that end I went to a local music stop that closing down...to see what they had on sale...

...well, no tuners...all sold out...but!

I came home with a great set of Bongo drums and a Bongo drum stand (along with a couple of other items - hey! 25-50 % off)!!!

Now I just have to figure out what to do with the Bongo drums...


Offline fiddlegirlLA

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #33 on: Dec 21, 2005, 08:03:30 PM »
Now I just have to figure out what to do with the Bongo drums...


Are your bongos tuned in equal-temperment? LOL.

I've decided not to go with equal temperment for the band I'm currently in because I like the slightly off, raw sound I get when I'm in just tuning and everyone else is in equally-tempered tuning. Actually, it has a lot to do with the fact that we have a cello in the band, too, and she tunes in just tuning, so it's better if we're in tune with each other. That may change at some point or in a different band, but for now I like to think of myself as tuned correctly and everyone else in the band as out of tune. LOL. 

Offline elbohead

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #34 on: Dec 24, 2005, 03:21:12 AM »
I have the Intellitouch tuner. Everyone at the jam sessions I attend had one so I bought one. Lots of players leave them on their instruments while playing, clamped to the headstock of a guitar, mandolin or banjo. This won't work with a fiddle due to the taper of the scroll. Other than that, I like it just fine. A friend did have one hint that has helped. Ball up your cleaning cloth and toss it in your case. With the tuner clamped in place, rest the scroll gently against the cloth. It seems to absorb some of the vibration, and makes the tuner "lock in" better.

Offline marktheharp

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #35 on: Jan 01, 2006, 07:59:40 PM »
We have managed to play with a number of tuners in our shop: my favourite so far for sheer value (ie great features for very little money) is the EMO tuner - an example at : http://www.danceofdelight.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=47&products_id=170

The reason I like this particular one is that it can cope with a very wide range of "A" pitch references (410-450), and it's the only one we carry which will give you an indication of which octave you're on (plus it has a metronome with a volume control, and can also "sound" any pitch). It comes with a contact mic which you can attach to your instrument.

As a harp player, I've also seen some really good contact tuners (similar to the Intellitouch ones) which harpists have built into their instruments so they can tune without having to grovel around in a bag and attach tuners / leads (for example, you can permanently build in to the front pillar of the harp in a position that you can see, but the audience can't - OK with a harp!).

PS the Intellitouch "barebones" (PT-2) is a very good model. The more expensive Intellitouch model, the PT-1, is different in that, apart from a backlight, it can be programmed to base its reference on any note from any instrument, so you can tune your instrument to that piano that can't (as) easily be tuned as your fiddle - and of course, it can cope with baroque pitches.

Finally, if you have an older digital tuner (for example, I have a couple of Korgs which I inherited when I bought two of my harps) you will find the newer tuners respond more quickly than older designs. It seems the software built into these things is better nowadays at very quick pitch recognition.

Offline Joyful noise

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Re: Electronic Tuners
« Reply #36 on: Jan 01, 2006, 08:43:55 PM »
I agree with B natural....
at most, a tuning fork (A) and your ears...   
Admit it is a problem when thinking about equal/unequal temerapment...    :laugh:
When i am with the authentic baroque lot, I tune to the oboe and pray hard about the rest!   ;)

 




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