Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Forum Shops

Affiliates



If you've forgotten your password or username, email madfiddler (link on the left of page).

Author Topic: Shoulder Rest & Mute  (Read 2467 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Xavier

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 20
  • Gender: Male

  • Total Badges: 22
    Badges: (View All)
    Level 5 Super Combination Combination
Shoulder Rest & Mute
« on: Apr 16, 2003, 10:27:27 PM »
Hi all

I will buy my first violin next week, I can't wait...I am actually counting the hours...

Anyway..

Do I really need a shoulder rest, and if so why, and why there are so many different types?

also...

Should i buy a mute? I live in an apartment, is it going to make my neighbours happy? or is it going to damage my new fiddle?

Thanks

 ;)

Offline Alan Kroeger

  • Senior Moderator
  • Someone with 5 blobs
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,052
  • Gender: Male
  • Global Grinch

  • Total Badges: 32
    Badges: (View All)
    Windows User Level 6 Invisible
Re:Shoulder Rest & Mute
« Reply #1 on: Apr 16, 2003, 11:12:59 PM »
Yes I think you should get a shoulder rest to start with at least if later you think you don't need one then stop using it, but almost everyone uses them. They help stabilize the position of the violin and it frees your left hand to move around on the fingerboard I use the following inexpensive type
http://www.swstrings.com/Store/Shopping.jsp?Category=Accessories&SubCategory=Shoulder+Rests&Group=181
and I use another more expensive type for my electrics Bon Musica.

You can use a rubber Mute which won't damage you violin or bridge, but they really kill the tone too, so you won't want to use it all the time. Another picture http://www.swstrings.com/Store/Shopping.jsp?Category=Accessories&SubCategory=Mutes&Group=M14

You don't have to buy these from these people it is not recomendation or an endorsement and you can find something along these lines at any violin shop.

Hope this helps
Al
Become a Forum Friend and get DISCOUNTS from our advertisers!
plus extra editing and avatar privileges.

Offline madfiddler

  • Forum Owner
  • Someone with 5 blobs
  • *****
  • Posts: 7,563
  • Gender: Male
  • Flit Kills Moths
    • madfiddler - Electric Violinist

  • Total Badges: 44
    Badges: (View All)
    Mobile User Level 7 5000 Posts
Re:Shoulder Rest & Mute
« Reply #2 on: Apr 16, 2003, 11:44:17 PM »
I use a "Willy Wolf" shoulder rest. Bridge recommeded the Bon Musica, and I couldn't get on with it at all. Just goes to show that even shoulder rests can be personal.

Trouble with the Wolf is, it needs something to grab hold of, which my electric hasn't got. So, minor surgery called with some speaker cable, and super glue *grin*

As for mutes, I have the black plastic one, which has made a mess of my bridge in terms of colouration. I've always liked the metal slidey ones, which rest on the strings between the bridge and the tailpiece. When you need it, you slide it up. I did hear once, that it can damage the strings though, don't know if there is any truth behind this.
Become a Forum Friend and get DISCOUNTS from our advertisers!
plus extra membership privileges.

Offline Alan Kroeger

  • Senior Moderator
  • Someone with 5 blobs
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,052
  • Gender: Male
  • Global Grinch

  • Total Badges: 32
    Badges: (View All)
    Windows User Level 6 Invisible
Re:Shoulder Rest & Mute
« Reply #3 on: Apr 17, 2003, 12:16:38 AM »
I think someone somewhere recomended possibly using a clothes pin it sounded feasable even if somewhat bizarre.
I can't rememer whether it was the spring type or clamp variety that was recomended. ;)
Become a Forum Friend and get DISCOUNTS from our advertisers!
plus extra editing and avatar privileges.

Offline Bob

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 879
  • Gender: Male

  • Total Badges: 24
    Badges: (View All)
    Level 5 Super Combination Combination
Re:Shoulder Rest & Mute
« Reply #4 on: Apr 17, 2003, 07:49:28 AM »
Xavier

Rests... should provide a stable platform - I would get a make/model that is adjustable in all directions because that gives it a greater chance of fitting your physique - Bon Musica are good (expensive), Kun (slightly less so), Wolf (the Primo and Secondo are the UK national favourites with professionals) and the better Viva's. The wooden vivas look especially nice! You can buy these on mail order and sometimes cheaper than a shop - but don't! Go to a reputable violin dealer and try several and get the advice from them - they'll help you find what fits you best. As you're in London Guiviers is a good bet and Ealing Strings also. Expect to spend between 20 and 35.

Mutes... I generally recommend the Tourte mutes for general use (black rubber/plastic) that slide up and hook over the bridge and the magnetic fixing ones. The wire type (Roth-Sihon) are the fastest to use as they simply slide up - but they do damage the string end windings - tney also have a slightly reduced muting effect compared with the Tourte. These are really for orchestral use though - few jazz or folk players use mutes. You can get 'practice' mutes - big heavy metal or rubber types that almost kill the sound volume - that I suspect is more what you need.

As for the violin I hope you're buying it from a reputable specialist? I ask this because the set-up on a violin is crucial - especially for a beginner - and only specialists tend to sell instruments that are correctly set-up. Most general music shops a) do not have a clue about violins and b) don;t have a repairer/maker on the premises. Perhaps the best question to ask is 'do you have a violin luthier on the staff?' If the reply is something like 'we send them out to somebody' that would make me worry about the quality of setup they do - and most shops in the UK that sell violins are really just shifting boxes! Another word of warning! One of the main suppliers of cheap and quality student instruments is Stentor and they say that their best range is set-up before they dispatch to the dealer. When I buy Stentor violins now I insist that they supply me with unset-up instruments as their version of what constitutes a set-up is appaling and I find I have to carry out remedial work to correct the mistakes!  I say this because some people will say that they do indeed supply violins 'ready to play' - do they hell! Check that your chosen supplier is listed in the 'Strad' directory!

Offline Xavier

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 20
  • Gender: Male

  • Total Badges: 22
    Badges: (View All)
    Level 5 Super Combination Combination
Re:Shoulder Rest & Mute
« Reply #5 on: Apr 17, 2003, 11:23:43 AM »
Hello

Thank you Bob...

I found a lttle violin shop in Stock Newington in London, they only sell acoustic string instruments, when I got there the first time they played the violin i was thinking of buying, I am no expert but it really sounded nice. But I am going to ask if one of them is a luthier. But I would think this shop should be quite well known, I don't think they would be many stores in this country (or any country) that specialise in violins and string instruments.

Offline Jack002

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,671

  • Total Badges: 25
    Badges: (View All)
    Tenth year Anniversary Windows User Level 5
Re:Shoulder Rest & Mute
« Reply #6 on: Apr 17, 2003, 02:20:23 PM »
Hi all

I will buy my first violin next week, I can't wait...I am actually counting the hours...

Anyway..

Do I really need a shoulder rest, and if so why, and why there are so many different types?

also...

Should i buy a mute? I live in an apartment, is it going to make my neighbours happy? or is it going to damage my new fiddle?

Thanks

 ;)
Xavier, congrats on getting your first violin! On to your questions...

Do you NEED a shoulder rest? Maybe, but its not like you can't play at all without one. *I* have one, a Kun, and I like it. My neck is somewhat long and I need it to be comfortable. I *can* play without it, but I prefer to use it. See if you can borrow one and try it.

A mute? Sure, I use one. I have two. One is a metal thing with fingers on it that holds onto the bridge, the other is a homemade job made from a spring paperclip. Can they damage the bridge? No, not the ones I use. You just push em on there and they hold on. Just be careful to not force it. Easy pressure is all it takes. One warning tho about mutes, don't use it unless you really have to. If you're just starting out you really need to learn to listen to the violin to hear it well. The act of putting your finger on the fingerboard exactally where it belongs over and over is a skill that takes a lot of time to develop. Using a mute will detract from the process. But once you've learned to play for a while, its less of a problem. Just keep that in mind when using one.

Welcome to the wonderful world of fiddle players!  ;D I know you'll never look back now!  ;) :)

Jack

Offline fiddlebob

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 985

  • Total Badges: 28
    Badges: (View All)
    Tenth year Anniversary Windows User Level 5
Re:Shoulder Rest & Mute
« Reply #7 on: Apr 20, 2003, 04:42:15 PM »
The "learn to listen" advice from Jack is as good as any advice you will ever get.  You can reduce bow pressure to reduce sound if you want to.

Here's a quick mute story.  My first jam session was at a music store early on a Saturday morning before the store opened for business.  We played until the coffee was ready and took a break.  After the break the other participants in the jam presented me with a mute.  I guess there really is a place for them!

By the way, a clothes pin really will work.

Good Fiddlin"

Fiddlebob

Offline Doug

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 12
  • I'm a llama!

  • Total Badges: 21
    Badges: (View All)
    Level 5 Super Combination Combination
Re:Shoulder Rest & Mute
« Reply #8 on: Apr 23, 2003, 01:48:17 PM »
You may need more or less rest height than someone else. They do help in many instances. An easy way to determine what height is comfortable for you is to use a folded towel on your shoulder as a guide. Fold or unfold the towel to determine how many layers are comfortable, then do a rough measurement on the thickness of the towel. I would sugges an adjustable rest.

Mutes are great in that they allow you to practice using full bow pressure and speed. Both my fiddles are quite loud and when played hard can shake the walls. I use a wire sliding type which can be used pushed up tight against the bridge. I have found that if I lift up the back part of the slide it is easier on the string windings. I found that trying to play a little quieter without the mute by using less pressure screwed up my bowing. It also makes you concentrate more on the bow pressure than on getting clean, clear notes. Use one.


 




Get Adobe Flash player


Fiddle and Alternative Strings Forum (c) 2016 Mark Knight /
SONiC FUEL
SimplePortal 2.3.7 © 2008-2020, SimplePortal