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Author Topic: Baroque style bows  (Read 947 times)

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Offline Nick2

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Baroque style bows
« on: Jun 11, 2018, 06:43:37 PM »
I'm seeing more and more people using baroque style bows these days, especially for folk styles.

Now given I always thought the "standard modern shape" Tourte design with the inversion of the curve, was devised to overcome problems with the older design, it intrigues me that people are going back to the old style.
Does anyone know why? Do these bows have a particular handling characteristic that makes them more suited for certain styles of playing?

I can understand that string ensembles playing baroque music, especially those that are trying to get as authentic a reproduction of the early sound as possible using plain gut strings and so on, might prefer them, but the only reason I can think of that people might prefer them is that they are a bit shorter and easier to handle in a tightly seated pub session without poking one's neighbour in the eye!

I'm sure that is part of the reason some fiddlers get into a habit of holding their bow a little way up from the frog, btw.
Now ear this!

Offline bwzuk

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Re: Baroque style bows
« Reply #1 on: Jun 12, 2018, 10:16:42 AM »
Gina le Faux has quite a lot to say on the subject, so it's worth chatting to her or checking out any talks she may be giving. The main argument is that the balance of baroque bows is better suited for the kind of bowing that was traditionally used for fiddle playing of the British Isles, and the functionality that drove the evolution of the bow (ability to player longer phrases, volume etc), aren't worth the stuff you lose switching away from a shorter bow. I don't think its a case of more recent bows being better, the changes were driven by the kind of classical music that was being written for violin.

I don't use one regularly myself so can't comment, but plenty of people swear by them.
« Last Edit: Jun 14, 2018, 01:18:54 PM by bwzuk »

Offline Nick2

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Re: Baroque style bows
« Reply #2 on: Jun 15, 2018, 01:31:00 PM »
Ahh. Thanks for that. I'll have to try one sometime.
Now ear this!

Offline chrisandcello

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Re: Baroque style bows
« Reply #3 on: Aug 23, 2018, 12:29:00 PM »
Hi, not posted for many years but stopped by and couldn't resist.
Have not been playing for those years but hope to start again once the tennis elbow goes.

I think baroque stylised bows are more practical in all senses. I particulary like their smaller size and lighter weight.
However, there are still the good and not so good to sort through ... as with any musical product

 




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