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Author Topic: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?  (Read 1780 times)

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Offline fiddledeedee

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Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« on: Sep 14, 2016, 01:27:48 AM »
Anyone here into creating their own backing tracks?  If yes, what are you using for recording equipment?  Computer? x-track recorder? 

I've got a couple of solo gigs coming up; the listeners are only expecting solo fiddle playing some tradition tunes.  I'm thinking (for future gigs) that recording my own backing tracks might be a nice addition.  So I'm looking for ideas on what works well for you.   TIA.
sheryl


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marton

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #1 on: Sep 14, 2016, 02:06:45 AM »
I don't use my backing tracks for live playing, but there's no reason they couldn't be used for that purpose. Ableton is probably the most comprehensive DAW and sound creation package available. It's non-linear and very feature rich, so much so that you'll probably, and I say probably because everyone's got different needs, so probably you'll never need anything else. Very high quality output and many output formats available. It's t if you have the time to roll up your sleeves and work it out it will reward you. 

Offline Joel Glassman

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #2 on: Sep 14, 2016, 04:25:00 AM »
I suggest Band in a box. This won't give you "how to" specifics, but shows a
bluegrass style result. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0mOZckcw8k
[Its been years since I used BB - learned acoustic guitar instead] The key seems to
be purchasing samples for the instrument tones. Using only the program and midi tones
works, but the effect is slightly cheezy for folk music. Better for jazz. This program is a
fantastic tool for creating lead sheets and composing linear music. A great bargain too.
It isn't a scoring program but heads in that direction

Offline bwzuk

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #3 on: Sep 14, 2016, 10:00:33 AM »
If you play your own instruments then any decent DAW and computer will do. I'd recommend Reaper because it's feature rich and cheap, with a generous trial period.

Offline madfiddler

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #4 on: Sep 14, 2016, 11:31:59 AM »
Reaper is gaining an excellent reputation these days.

Personally I use Cubase since I've been using it ever since it first came out on the Atari ST computer.

In terms of getting something profession sounding, quickly, Band in a Box does what it says on the box... however you can make it a lot more convincing using decent software synths.

Drums: Superior Drummer 2 - https://www.toontrack.com/product/superior-drummer-2/
Drums (loops): Spectrasonics Stylus RMX - https://www.spectrasonics.net/products/stylusrmx.php
Guitars: Orange Tree samples - https://www.orangetreesamples.com/products (I prefer to use Native Instruments Guitar Rig for the FX side rather than the built in ones)
Bass: Orange Tree samples - https://www.orangetreesamples.com/products or Spectrasonics Trillian - https://www.spectrasonics.net/products/trilian.php

Or... you could get Native Instruments Komplete which has reasonably good everything(s) - https://www.native-instruments.com/en/products/komplete/bundles/komplete-11/

If you want to do things yourself and not 'Band in a Box' it, then the above still stands however for guitars, you may consider Virtual Guitarist - https://www.virtualguitarist.com/ - which is pretty much a Band in the Box jsut for guitars. Play a chord, select a style, and off you go.
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Offline fiddledeedee

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #5 on: Sep 15, 2016, 01:29:02 AM »
I actually was thinking about playing my own tracks... and keeping it simple with an acoustic folk sound.  I've got enough menagerie of instruments here, 3-4 tracks would probably give me the sound I need.
sheryl

Offline bluesviolin

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #6 on: Sep 16, 2016, 06:56:14 AM »
 
I've got a couple of solo gigs coming up; the listeners are only expecting solo fiddle playing some tradition tunes. 

Can you tell me a bit more about what type of gigs these are? what size audience? Venue? how long are you expected to play? and if you are thinking of branching out and doing more of this.

...when I was playing old folks homes, I'd introduce the song, say what year it was composed (most of them were around 1929 to 1945) and then I would read prompt notes off a music stand for 6 or 8 interesting/amusing things that happened in that year. For a 1 hour 'show' this would translate into about 35 minutes playing time and 25 min 'entertaining' the old folks with the a fore mentioned schtick.

So... I'm thinking if you wanted or needed to stretch things out a bit and not just go from one tune to the next,  you might talk about the tune a bit...what type of tune it is...history...whatever you can think of.

Perhaps you've already thought of this....just a suggestion.
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Offline fiddledeedee

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #7 on: Sep 17, 2016, 02:24:49 AM »
Thanks BluesV.  One gig is down and out.  I was the background music for a 'western themed dinner'.  Solo violin (as no one else was immediately available.) It would have been fun having some guitar strumming, bass, mandolin, etc.  Because it wasn't a performance, there really wasn't an talk in between tunes,  just me embellishing the solo several times, then moving on to the next piece.
sheryl

Offline peakfiddler

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #8 on: Sep 17, 2016, 01:38:18 PM »
Reaper is fantastic, have used it for many years and it always works without issue.
Can take a while to really get into it.

Ableton Lite is very quick and easy to get loops recorded and a backing track up and running in no time.
Took me a couple of weeks to get into it + went on the free Coursera training units. Which greatly reduced the learning time.

I won a copy of Izotope Ozone 7, which is simply the best thing ever, to get everything sounding right in a mix.

Offline genemaniac

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Re: Making your own backing tracks... what do you use?
« Reply #9 on: Sep 23, 2016, 06:11:55 PM »
I use a loop station to create my backing tracks.

The Boss RC-3 is a good one.  Of, course, with it being a digital peda,l you would have to play into a mic, or with an electric violin.  An amp is required as well.   The RC-3 allows you to save your loop tracks in memory - or on an SD card, and call them up whenever you need them.

Here is a good video that gives you an idea how it works.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGidVRxnPDU

 




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