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Author Topic: Fiddle bows  (Read 7683 times)

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Offline Nox

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #25 on: Mar 09, 2004, 01:27:37 AM »
...nope...but I have Saldo!...(brazilwood)...


...there now!  Another question not answered...and I should have just kept reading...LOL...

Offline fidla

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #26 on: Mar 13, 2004, 04:10:31 PM »
I think the weight of the bow matters more to a player who has trained with a specific weight over a period of many years than to the player who is just starting out or has played for say 3-10 years.  I've been playing for 38 years and I have to have a light bow (around 55 g).  I can play on a heavier bow, but I don't have the same control that I have with the lighter bow.  

The company I work for is in the final development stages of a prototype Fiddler's Bow.  I've mentioned this before, but development was put on hold after the latest model of chinese carbon bows entered the market and analysis had to be done.  We're back with a new set of requirements and improvements.  THose who have already emailed me with a request to be a bow tester (Rob), please email me again if still interested.  If there is anyone else who would like to be a tester, email me and we'll get you set up with one of these bows when they're ready to go out.

Thanks

Offline Nox

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #27 on: Mar 13, 2004, 05:36:03 PM »
I'd luv to test another bow!  Still can't get over the difference they all make!  But, it's too complicated to ship things over here...and you probably want more professional player...

Offline Graham Clark

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #28 on: Mar 14, 2004, 02:50:52 AM »
balance is more important than weight

gc

Offline giannaviolins

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #29 on: Mar 14, 2004, 03:41:39 AM »
Tried an Arcolla CF.  Very nice.  Lighter feel than the Cadenza Artist.  Have the Arcos Brazil rep visiting soon. Will be interesting to see their stuff.

Offline fidla

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #30 on: Mar 14, 2004, 06:46:02 AM »
Tried an Arcolla CF.  Very nice.  Lighter feel than the Cadenza Artist.  Have the Arcos Brazil rep visiting soon. Will be interesting to see their stuff.

Steve, give me a call after they visit, ok?  There's a lot of problems now with Brazilian bow companies and pernambuco.  I don't know how many of you know about this, but pernambuco is protected by CITES, and can not be transported across the Brazilian country, except for "documented pre-CITES product".  Companies such as Water Violet, Horst John, Marco Raposo and Arcos Brazil have been forced to document the source of their pernambuco stock to the Brazilian government.  Very interesting and controversial!  Many Chinese companies now calling their bows "pernambuco" are swiftly changing over to "brazil wood" or "composite" to avoid fines and charges from the Brazilian government!  I heard recently from top officials in the IPIG that many of these Brazilian companies will be forced to shut down and cease production until inventory and stock can be authenticized.  

So where does that leave the rest of us?   For those bow makers that are just getting started, will have to source a different material as pernambuco is becoming rarer than ever.  Some folks are using iron wood, snakewood, and this manilkara kauki from Australia.  But carbon is becoming the material of choice as more and more Chinese manufacturers are entering the marketplace.

It will be interesting to see what shakes out in these next 5-10 years.

Adam

Offline Pilgrum

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #31 on: Mar 14, 2004, 03:06:57 PM »
balance is more important than weight
gc
If 80% of violin playing is in the bowing,
balance is 80% of the bow,
then, the stick maybe the razors edge of fine playing.

Offline swarbrules

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #32 on: Mar 14, 2004, 04:35:34 PM »
 But carbon is becoming the material of choice as more and more Chinese manufacturers are entering the marketplace.

It will be interesting to see what shakes out in these next 5-10 years.

Adam

Others have said on various forums that carbon will be the material of the future and this does lead to an interesting situation and a dilemma for those contemplating a new bow.

Over the next few years, will the Chinese concentrate on carbon and what will that lead to? But, perhaps more important, will specialists start looking to carbon and if they do, what will that do to the price of quality bows? Will we finish up with a major manufacturer making a variety of blanks with the bow maker trimming, balancing and finishing?

Offline fidla

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #33 on: Mar 14, 2004, 08:07:07 PM »
It is indeed fascinating.  New bow makers will be forced to look for alternative woods, as carbon is more of a manufacturing item than a material worked with hand tools and skilled craftsmanship (in the case of pernambuco and other woods).  Most carbon bows are turned on a lathe or some similar tool, punched out of a sheet of carbon or heated and rotated over a metal rod with a plugged tip.  Not much skill involved there.

Offline swarbrules

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #34 on: Mar 14, 2004, 09:23:06 PM »
Not much skill involved there.

But where does that leave us with some of the prices?

In the world of golf, we went from hickory shafts to steel (not a good idea for bows) and on to carbon fibre. Every few weeks there is a new shaft that promises better flex and torque will bows go the same way?

Offline fidla

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #35 on: Mar 19, 2004, 02:42:42 AM »
funny you should ask about pricing.  you will find it varies a great deal from manufacturer to manufacturer.  Some CF bows are in the $3-5k USD range and some are in the $100-500 USD range.  And many in between.

With carbon and other composite bows, it has more to do with assembly and components than skill in manufacturing (there isn't much skill in stamping something with a machine is there?).

I have seen some terrible cf bows where the frogs don't rest on the stick, there is too much hair.  Bows where the camber is way up the stick towards the head, where the tip is a clunky piece of plastic with a metal plug in the stick (and a visible seam between the tip and the stick).  

There is a lot of rubbish out there.  And a lot of good.

In my experience the best thing to do is go to a good violin shop and try a variety of them until you find something you like.

There is no hard and fast rule with bows.

Offline chifiddler

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #36 on: Mar 24, 2004, 07:07:57 AM »
I am lucky enough to live by a fiddle shop that lets you try out four bows at a time for a week or two. That way, you can play them as you would for practice or in public and see the responsiveness in that situation.  I bought a great perumbaco bow from them after trying around ten bows this way. If you have that access to a shop, they might let you take a couple home and practice with them! :)

Offline Hausse1

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Re:Fiddle bows
« Reply #37 on: Apr 21, 2004, 07:39:42 PM »
Regarding the situation of Pernambuco wood, it is NOT controled by Cites. There is a very strong effort by bowmakers worldwide and the brazilian bow companies to preserve and protect the sustainable use of this resource.
If you would like to see some credible information on the matter, check out the Smithsonian April 2004 issue on the stands right now, further info can be found on the May issue of Strings magazine.
Both articles can be viewed online as well.  

 




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