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Author Topic: Impulse Buy  (Read 6645 times)

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Offline Worldfiddler

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #25 on: Mar 06, 2010, 06:32:45 PM »
Judging by the pic, the 1st dot is behind the 5th fret, and the 2nd dot is behind the 7th.

The way I think about them is :

open string to 1st dot = a musical 4th interval

open string to 2nd dot = a musical 5th interval

open string to the double dots = one octave interval

Why not pop it under your chin for a minute and see how the fingering / notes  compares with the fiddle? Seriously.

Jim

Offline concertA

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #26 on: Mar 06, 2010, 06:40:19 PM »
Yes, I have been comparing, Jimmie Jo.  Let's see...yes, open to first would be a 4th.  I'll try the octave double-dots.  That's cool.

Are they the same as the dots on a guitar?  What is the purpose of guitar fingerboard dots?  I think it's because people who play fretted instruments are obviously not as intelligent as us non-fretted fiddlers and need more help knowing their way around the fingerboard.   ;)

Offline madmat

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #27 on: Mar 06, 2010, 07:07:50 PM »
Are they the same as the dots on a guitar?  What is the purpose of guitar fingerboard dots?
Same as mando dots, same positions.
Quote
I think it's because people who play fretted instruments are obviously not as intelligent as us non-fretted fiddlers and need more help knowing their way around the fingerboard.   ;)
It's a lot harder to use "the force" when the scale length gets to eighteen inches or so. Exhibit A is my cello intonation... :P

Some folks are more visual... that and your intonation on guitars, mandos, banjoes, viola di gambi, et al is fixed by the frets. ;)
Not your mama, or Yo-yo Ma!

Offline Joe Gerardi

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #28 on: Mar 06, 2010, 10:19:12 PM »
Geez, what IS that piece of rubbish???

The one to the right of the cool mandolin I mean...

;D

..Joe
"Some people are like a Slinky... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs"

Offline Worldfiddler

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #29 on: Mar 06, 2010, 10:39:21 PM »
Quote
Geez, what IS that piece of rubbish???

The one to the right of the cool mandolin I mean...

Excuse me, Mr Joe .. how dare you! I happen to have played that fiddle belonging to Ms Heidi-Ho, at Buxton 2006, and it is most certainly not a piece of rubbish. It has a sweet and truly enchanting tone, befitting of such a wonderful young lady. Sheesh!! I suggest you get your ass over here to Buxton 2010 and play it too!!!! :)

Mr Jim

(Heidi, was that OK?)

Offline Joe Gerardi

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #30 on: Mar 06, 2010, 10:43:47 PM »
Mr. Jim...

Did you just call Heidi a ho???

;D

..Joe
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Offline Worldfiddler

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #31 on: Mar 06, 2010, 10:51:59 PM »
Quote
Did you just call Heidi a ho???

Nope. I'm just having fun here :) I did play that fiddle of hers, tho. It's sweet.

Mr Jim

Offline concertA

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #32 on: Mar 06, 2010, 10:54:55 PM »
Mr. Jim...

Did you just call Heidi a ho???

;D

..Joe

LOL 

Offline woodwiz

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #33 on: Mar 06, 2010, 10:57:29 PM »
When you play mandolin, you don't play first, third and fifth position.  Every fret is a position.  Once you learn a closed scale - Ab for example, you just have to move up a fret to play in A, two frets for Bb, etc.  There are about 15 basic closed chord positions, and once you relate them to the few scale patterns, you can play in any key just by changing your "home" position.

The dots are visual cues that hep you keep track. Playing guitar is much the same.  In the fiddle world, you just about have to play guitar and mando, too - if only to recognize the chords people are playing when you are jamming to a tune you never played before.

I like playing mando because it helps me think in chords, and I'm starting to use the scale patterns on fiddle, too, and pretty much ignore the standard positions.  Makes improvising in the flat keys a breeze.

Offline Happy Camper

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #34 on: Mar 07, 2010, 05:34:19 PM »

I played mandolin for a long time, but always wanted to play the fiddle.

I really like both instruments, but the fiddle is best for me.  I can play the mandolin, like the guitar for about two hours and my fingers are so sore that I have to quit for awhile.

The fiddle, I can play all day and all night and my fingers never get sore.  Playing the fiddle and the mandolin are pretty much the same for fingering, but that is sure where it stops being similar.

When I first started learning the fiddle - I wondered where the frets were.  However, they are so much the same that it was not a problem for long.

Going to a lot of festivals and jams, I see a lot of fiddlers play their fiddle and then get out their mandolin and play for awhile.

My choice now is sure the fiddle.  There are a lot of guitar and mandolin players, but less with the fiddle.

Most times, you can walk up to a jam in a campground or somewhere and you are welcome to join with a guitar or mandolin, but if you have a fiddle - you are more than welcome.

Offline concertA

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #35 on: Mar 10, 2010, 02:24:16 PM »
That mandolin tremolo thing is tough!  I'm figuring out the frets better now, but I sure can't do tremolo very evenly. 

Offline Skillet

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #36 on: Apr 28, 2010, 04:47:43 PM »
I played mando for several years before I took up fiddle, and I think knowledge of the mandolin fretboard helped my fiddling a lot. Also, mando isn't very loud, so it's great when I want to just chop along at a pick. I find the fiddler at a pick becomes the de facto leader, and sometimes I'd rather play in the background.

I agree that it's useful for fiddlers to also know the guitar and mando so you can recognize the chords people are playing. I play guitar, mando, and fiddle, and my wife plays bass, guitar, and piano. Together, we can fill any needed gaps at a pick (except banjo--but who wants that gap filled?).

One other advantage mando has over fiddle: it's not very sensitive to weather and humidity, so it's great for river rafting trips and other wilderness outings. I stick my cheap mando in a dry sack and throw it in the canoe or raft. I'd never do that with my fiddle.

Offline genemaniac

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #37 on: Feb 08, 2011, 07:57:10 PM »
Here are a few suggestions I have for helping you learn the mandolin.  As a violin, mando, and guitar player, I've used some of this to help me transition between instruments.
I'm not sure if this will work for you, but give it a try:  Pick a tune you want to practice, take your violin, and hold it like you would your mandolin.  Pluck out the tune.... your fingers will probably find the right notes since you are accustomed to that instrument.
Now pick up the mando...play the tune WITHOUT LOOKING AT YOUR FRETTING HAND.   You will likely find that your violin 'muscle memory' will land your fingers very close to the right notes on the mando.  Make sure to listen carefully to the notes.  If you get a 'buzzing' sound make the slight finger adjustment forward to land right behind the fret. Key here is still - don't look. Same procedure if a note sounds muted...move finger back slightly (again to position just behind fret).   By not looking at the fretboard, you avoid being thrown off by fret position confusion.
As for your picking hand, I would suggest concentrating on doing down-strokes until you get used to the instrument.  The down/up/down/up picking can come later once you become proficient at picking individual notes without hitting other strings. 
I wouldn't be overly concerned at the beginning stages about sounding both strings of a note perfectly. This will come in time as you get better at playing the instrument.
Also practice coordinating left hand fretting and right hand picking, so that both hands are hitting at the same time.  This kind of thing  comes easier to those already familiar with guitar, but if your background is all violin, this will have to be a seperate practice regimen. Scales are good for practicing this.  Think in terms of how stacatto violin bow strokes are coordinated with fingering.
I hope you can find something in all this to help you out.  These suggestions may or may nor be what others would recommend, but they have worked for me.
Enjoy your mando.....

Offline genemaniac

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Re: Impulse Buy
« Reply #38 on: Feb 08, 2011, 08:00:06 PM »
OK ,my bad...I started replying to this thread without even noticing how old it was.  Geez, you're probably a pro at the mando by now.....

 




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