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Author Topic: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century  (Read 22575 times)

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Offline MM

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Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« on: Nov 04, 2009, 02:33:39 AM »
Hello - I guess this is the appropriate forum in which to post this question. 

I'm deeply interested in learning about Thomas Perry and have pretty much exhausted resources available to me - including searches in academic journals online via the university where I work (in the U.S.) as well as all the usual search engines.  I've seen the books which list Perry among violin makers of his time and there is conflicting information about him.  In fact, there doesn't even seem to be agreement on the year of his death!  Additionally, I've read that his son-in-law became his partner (William Wilkinson) and then I read that this is absolutely not true!

Does anyone have a suggestion about a source I could pursue at this point?  By the way, I have also searched the Maestronet forums.

Many thanks.
-MM

Offline Joe Gerardi

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #1 on: Nov 04, 2009, 02:40:08 AM »
Dunno if non-members can search our member database, but if you can, look for and contact fubbi- he's created the definitive maker's database.

..Joe
"Some people are like a Slinky... not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs"

Offline MM

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #2 on: Nov 04, 2009, 02:44:51 AM »
Hi - thanks Joe.  Maybe he will see my question.  this search is quickly becoming an obsession with me.  Meanwhile - I will see if I can locate Fubbi.

Offline fubbi

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #3 on: Nov 04, 2009, 04:55:15 AM »
Hello - I guess this is the appropriate forum in which to post this question. 

I'm deeply interested in learning about Thomas Perry and have pretty much exhausted resources available to me - including searches in academic journals online via the university where I work (in the U.S.) as well as all the usual search engines.  I've seen the books which list Perry among violin makers of his time and there is conflicting information about him.  In fact, there doesn't even seem to be agreement on the year of his death!  Additionally, I've read that his son-in-law became his partner (William Wilkinson) and then I read that this is absolutely not true!

Does anyone have a suggestion about a source I could pursue at this point?  By the way, I have also searched the Maestronet forums.

Many thanks.
-MM

MM - I don't know what other investigation you've done, but perhaps this will help:

From: "The Violin Family and its Makers in the British Isles"
by Brian W. Harvey, Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995; pp183-185

Thomas Perry
It is against this background that the work of Thomas Perry of Dublin (c.1744-1818) has to be assessed. Perry's work is in fact of such quality that he must rank as one of the finest makers in the entire British Isles during this period. It is now widely accepted that he came from a Huguenot family and was related to Claude Pierray, the Parisian violin-maker, the surname having been adapted. Perry is first recorded as having worked at 6 Anglesea Street, Dublin, later moving to
Anglesea Street. John Dilworth, writing in the Strad, states that Thomas Perry took over his father's workshop on the latter's death in 1778. It was during this period that Richard Tobin became his apprentice and Vincenzo Panormo worked with Perry prior to moving to London, as discussed above.
Tradition has it that Perry was able to copy an Amati lent to him by the Duke of Leinster, but his other models are of a more Tyrolean type or reminiscent of the work of Richard Duke in London (with whom some say that he was in his early days associated). Perry usually used attractive wood with a brown, reddish, or golden-amber varnish. Since he is credited with having made more than 3,000 instruments it is not surprising that his work is variable, but tonally they are generally highly regarded by professional orchestral players. Most of his violins are thought to have been numbered and branded 'THOMAS PERRY' under the button on the back. (The brand is often found on German forgeries.) One identifying characteristic is the soundholes which tend to have a small aperture at the top, the narrow stem gradually widening to the lower turn. Henley finds this gives a somewhat unbalanced look to the design. Although the majority of instruments were violins, violas and cellos are known and one double bass is mentioned by Meredith Morris. A fine cello labelled in manuscript 'Thos. Perry No. 6 Anglesey Street Dublin 1785' and branded 'Perry Dublin' sold for £7,500 in Phillips's London sale in April ici. There is a fine quartet, and a double bass, of the 'Irish Stradivarius' in the National Museum of Ireland, Dublin.
Much has been made of the fact that although Perry's firm apparently continued to trade as 'Perry and Wilkinson' after 1818, Perry and Wilkinson were probably never in partnership, though William Wilkinson married Perry's daughter. The general view is that standards declined after 1818: 'a lamentable falling-off in workmanship, modelling and tone' (Henley). A fairer picture is perhaps that quality became much more variable. Some good work was produced from this workshop but owing to labelling problems it is not always clear what was sold after 1818 but made under Perry's direction beforehand.
The workshop of Perry and Wilkinson appears to have been discontinued after 1839 and from then on, although violin-making by no means disappeared, there is an absence of any pre-eminent makers. As in Scotland there is considerable evidence that where an instrument could not be bought locally, somewhat rustic models were knocked up in the local carpenter's or wheelwright's workshop. The author was able to inspect one of these emanating from the late nineteenth century in County Donegal—an attractive instrument in its own way whose highly arched modelling produced the piping, penetrating tone that would have been appropriate
for the local ceilidh. But a survey would probably show that the majority of instruments played by folk-fiddlers from the middle of the nineteenth century onwards were common German or French imports.
Although Perry dominated the scene, there have been a number of other Irish makers worthy of notice and Meredith Morris refers to a booklet on Irish makers by the Revd Fr. Greaven, to whom he is obviously indebted. A contemporary of Perry's was John Delany, who followed the Amati model and Morris states that there is a fine example of his work in what is now the National Museum, Dublin. A man of what were then radical views, Delany's label, having given the maker's
particulars, ends with the message 'LIBERTY TO ALL THE WORLD, BLACK AND WHITE'. Morris also says that there is a specimen of the work of one Molyneux, of Huguenot French extraction, working c.i800, in the Dublin museum. The exhibited instrument has Italian characteristics.
Of more modern makers, since at any one time there must always have been at least ten and perhaps up to twenty makers whose instruments circulate in trade, no brief account can be comprehensive. It is clear that, as in the rest of the British Isles, makers could gain encouragement and recognition by exhibiting their work at arts and crafts festivals and the like. One such was Edward Keenan of Dublin (1876-1935), who was able to copy the Stradivarius `Vieuxtemps' owned by Professor Joshua Watson of Dublin and whose violin won first prize at the Royal Dublin Society Art Exhibitions of 1913, 1914, 1915, 1919, 1923, and 1925, and the highest award at the Aonach Tailtean Medal of Art in 1924 and 1928.
Morris speaks particularly enthusiastically about the work of Robert Irvine who worked in Belfast from about 1893 to 1925. His models are along Stradivarian lines and attract considerable plaudits from both Morris and Henley. His instruments are dated and numbered. Morris also picks out the work of George Rogers, Conlig, Co. Down, who flourished about 1900. In this connection Morris makes the following characteristic comments, written in 1920, which appropriately close this chapter:
It is worthy of remark that the majority of Irish makers have a decided preference for the Strad model, whereas Scottish makers have a penchant for the Joseph [Guarneri] model. Perhaps the national temperament has something to do with the respective choice. The Irish are fervid, sympathetic and responsive; the Scotch dour, persistent, and practical. With the exception of Italy there is no soil in the world more rich in art productibility than Ireland. The country which produced the fine old artists of a century ago is capable of even greater things, and when the Emerald Isle is regenerated and its sorrows forgotten, the memory of fiddles that are yet unmade will gladden the land.
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Offline MM

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #4 on: Nov 04, 2009, 02:06:17 PM »
THANK YOU!  This does indeed have a couple more leads to follow up with.  You are wonderful!!!
-MM

Offline Columbo

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #5 on: Nov 23, 2009, 11:19:13 PM »
Hey there MM..
It might interest you that I play a Thomas Perry 5 string Viola that dates from c.1770. It has very distinctive flame f-holes and it's shape resembles that of a double bass. It was originally made as a six string 'Sultana' and then got modified to being a 5 string Viola - 'Quinton' about 150 years ago.
It sounds incredible and I pinch myself everyday I open my case!
I would be interested in gathering as much information about this instument as possible.. Stamped on the button is 'Perry Dublin 677'.






Offline MM

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #6 on: Nov 24, 2009, 01:20:31 AM »
Hello Columbo - and how fortunate you are!  I'm happy to do some searching in the academic databases to which I have access and will let you know if anything pops up about your viola.  One question - is the instrument referred to as "Quinton" or is that what you have named it?  It must be magnificent!  Another avenue of inquiry for you would be to post your question on TheSession.org since it is comprised primarily of those folks who are committed to Irish Traditional music.  There is a member of The Session named Mike Allen who is a luthier near Tipperary who is quite interested in Irish violin makers and instruments and has done a great deal of research.

Sometime it would be lovely to hear you playing Quinton - perhaps you can post an audio file?

-MM

Offline Columbo

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #7 on: Nov 24, 2009, 07:21:34 AM »

Hi there MM..
If you send me your email I'll send you a picture and sound..
On the other hand if you could let me know how to post a jpg and a
sound-file on this forum let me know..
It was the luthier I got the instrument from that said that from looking at his catalogues of old instruments that it most resembled a Quinton or Sultana..
I just refer to it as a 5 string Viola.
Thanks for the tip re session.org..
I'm looking forward to finding out more about this instrument of mine..
All good!



 

Offline MM

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #8 on: Nov 24, 2009, 04:29:28 PM »
Hi Columbo - you might want to take a look at the following bits which I found via Google (of all things).

Found at this link:  http://www.ricercare.com/research/library/dictionary/p_contents.html 

 

Perry.
Branded “J. Perry, Kilkenny” below button on the back.
------------------------------
Made by James Perry
Kilkenny. No. 200 1785
------------------------------
(written)
Said to have produced 300 instruments, including violas and ’cellos. £50, 1960.

PERRY, STEPHEN
Worked at Lowell (Mass), 1908.

PERRY, THOMAS
Much ambiguity concerning his antecedents has floated about for many years. Some writers have conjectured that he was born in England, and was employed by Richard Duke, an affirmation only supported by the similarity of the Perry fiddles with those of Duke. Gratton Flood (indefatigable researcher through the archives of Irish history) formulated the opinion that Perry was born in Dublin, 1744, and that he was the son of a Thomas Pierrie (also a violin maker) working at Temple Bar in that city. This Pierrie was undoubtedly a descendant of one of the many Huguenots who escaped from France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 1685, to find security and prosperity in other lands, also that he was possibly a connection of the Pierray fiddle making family at Paris. Faulkner’s Dublin Journal, 1771, gives the following notice: “Died, Mr. Pierrie, on Temple Bar, Fiddle maker”. Young Thomas most probably carried on his father’s business at the same address until 1778 when he changed his name to Perry and established himself at No. 6 Anglesea Street, where he died, 1818. First productions came in the year 1760 when in 16th year. Any dated earlier must be fraudulent. Best period, 1778-1808. Numbered all his violins and known to have made more than 3,000. None genuine dated after 1818, although many instruments dated up to 1835 have been circulated and bear the nomenclature of Perry, but these are the products of Wilkinson (one of his assistants), a circumstance opening up considerable controversy giving rise to all sorts of fabulous mis-statements concerning the inequality of Perry’s work. He certainly was very variable, but never produced anything wholly bad, and the responsibility for the inferior instruments bearing his name should rest on Wilkinson who was altogether an indifferent workman but had good business capacities. Perry’s highest artistic ability and executive genius were irradiated when perfectly copying an Amati loaned to him by the Duke of Leinster. These examples are beautifully finished to the minutest detail inside and outside, perfectly symmetrical from north to south and from east to west. Some earlier productions belong more to the Albani and Stainer types. These have an outline much less attractive than the Amati-modelled, curves less classic, some high shouldered with squarish upper bouts, but never positively ugly and, concerning this last statement, we hope to be pardoned for contradicting the opinions of certain connoisseurs. Arching also varies, the earlier examples being of higher build than the later dated, but none are lower than medium, while many verge towards bulginess. Middle bouts often too straightish and shallow. The violins reminiscent of a Richard Duke are almost perfect representations and belong to his early period. One of Perry’s easily recognised characteristics belongs to the sound-holes, small aperture at the top and the very narrow commencement of the stem which gradually widens almost to the lower turn, giving to this lower part a somewhat exaggerated proportion to the higher. Occasionally he set the sound-holes a little too far up, which causes the bridge to be placed slightly higher than normal, and renders the stop shorter. Cutting of the scrolls also varies and here he never seems to have achieved anything particularly wondrous. Frequently exercised careful judgment in the selection of wood, usually delicately grained pine for the belly and prettily marked maple for the back and ribs. But, owing to temperamental vagaries, experiments and possibly having to cope with the insistent demand of an oft-times impatient clientèle, he utlised pine of coarser or softer grain, often less excellently acoustical, as well as plainer figured maple. Earlier violins have a darkish brown shade of varnish not particularly lustrous and not prepared from the purest ingredients. Best period instruments have one of a rich reddish or golden amber tint, really quite beautiful in appearance, of grand texture and magnificently applied. Tone quality typically belongs to what is generally denominated English, and is not so persuasively sweet as the Italian, nevertheless it has a distinctiveness which cannot entirely be likened or associated with that of any other fiddles. This tone is by no means really strong or finely penetrative, therefore soloists eschew the instruments; but amateurs, glorying in their drawing-room quartet playing, find themselves captivated with its peculiar “timbre”, one of a distinctly warm and round mellowness very readily responsive. Authenticated Perry’s catalogued at £40, 350 dollars in the United States. The National Museum authorities at Dublin have acquired five specimens of Perry’s genius, two violins, viola, ’cello and a double bass (this supposed to be the only one he built). Often been sobriqueted as the “Irish Stradivarius”. Branded “Thomas Perry” under the button on the back, although the label may be “Perry and Wilkinson”. Many bear no label and are often the better instruments.
----------------------------------------
Made by
Thos. Perry and Wm. Wilkinson
Musical instrument Makers
No. 6 Anglevea Street.
No. 1502 Dublin, 1789
----------------------------------------
A large cither-viol had the following label:
-------------------
Made by
Thomas Perry
Dublin 1767
-------------------
William Wilkinson (apprenticed to Perry) assisted him throughout the subsequent years, became his son-in-law, and continued the business until 1839, when he either retired or died. The violins dated after 1818 show a lamentable falling-off in workmanship, modelling and tone, and Perry’s name has not infrequently been smudged in consequence. The highest number we have seen indicated on their label is 4,520, an astounding output. Perry and Wilkinson specimens dated after 1818 valued at £20 (1925). £80, 1960 (for good specimen).

Offline ajm

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2010, 08:29:22 PM »
Hi, just discovered this site today.

I own a Thomas Perry cello, stamped Perry Dublin just beneath the button.   It's got a beautiful yellow amber varnish.  I feel incredibly lucky to have it and only wish that I could play it as well as I know it can sound.

I'm always looking for as much information as I can find on it.

Offline awildman2384

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #10 on: Jul 06, 2010, 06:58:28 AM »
His instruments seem to be well-sought-after in some(many?) Irish trad circles.

Offline Tize

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #11 on: Jul 10, 2010, 11:25:07 PM »
His instruments seem to be well-sought-after in some(many?) Irish trad circles.

Not over here that I've ever heard of!

Offline awildman2384

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #12 on: Jul 15, 2010, 03:48:17 PM »
Mebbe it's just (some) Americans wanting a genuwine Irish-built instrument then.  I was told by someone quite savvy about the Irish trad scene talking about it, and just assumed it was an Irish thing in general.  I've been known to generalize too much on occasion.

Offline chifiddler

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #13 on: Jul 15, 2010, 08:25:49 PM »
Mebbe it's just (some) Americans wanting a genuwine Irish-built instrument then.  I was told by someone quite savvy about the Irish trad scene talking about it, and just assumed it was an Irish thing in general.  I've been known to generalize too much on occasion.

I have  not heard that they are really sought after in the USA either, maybe it depends on what part of the USA you are talking about?

Offline elainemarleneforbes

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #14 on: Jul 27, 2010, 05:07:41 AM »
I believe that Wilkinson did apprentice to Thomas Perry and was his son in law. 

I am aware of many stories about the relationship between these families and their origins although I am not a researcher but the stories may be of help to someone wishing to research the Irish violin Perrys

Keep in mind that it is believed that there were two Thomas Perrys who operated from Angelsea.  Presumably father and son.  (one lived from maybe 1730 to 1771 and one 1750 to 1818)

(There are two James Perrys father and son who made violins in Ireland in the same period.  I believe the elder James was brother to the elder Thomas and the younger cousin to the more famous Thomas)

I believe that the more famous Thomas was the son and his son in law was Wilkinson. 

What is clearly true is that the Wilkinsons and Perrys were very interrelated.  I have been shown many historical deeds and wills from this period have Wilkinsons and Perrys mentioned in the same documents.   Some of them were said to be related to each other in more than one way.

Thomas's daughter Elizabeth married William Wilkinson in 1794.  His mother was also named Elizabeth Perry. It is thought that his mother Elizabeth was likely a cousin of some degree to Thomas.

John Perry 1782 to 1846 immigrated to Canada and he named his son William Wilkinson.  This John Perry is believed to be the nephew of Thomas 1750 to 1818 (dates approximate)


The oral family history of the branch that moved to Canada is that they were from Alsace Lorraine and Hugenots. Their name on arriving in Ireland was de Perriay and they changed it to Perry to fit in with the many Perry families living there. This family's oral history is that the Perrys learned to make violins in Europe and are related to a number of violin makers in more than one European country.   However scholars have said that Thomas Perry studied under an English maker but also that his resin was different and of unknown origin.   I do not find these two stories inconsistent. It could have been a family trade to make violins but Thomas may have still apprenticed under an English violin maker.

After all lawyers may follow their parents into the law but not apprentice for their parents.

Some believe that these Perrys are also related to families named Perez who are Shepardic Jews.  It has been suggested that this branch of the Perrys were descended from Jews who converted to Christianity.  This would support that they came from Europe (rather than England)

There are Perrys in England who are also Jewish and maybe related but the Canadian descendents of the Irish violin makers believe that they came directly from Europe to Ireland.

There are also Luthiers who are descended from this family (which of course makes sense) but also entertainers.  Playing the violin was the hobby of many generations of the branch of the family that immigrated to Canada.

These Perrys were also closely connected to Armstrongs. Deeds from Ireland also mention people named Thomas, john or james Perry and people named Armstrong.  In Canada John Perry 1804 to 1870 (another generation down) married an Anne Armstrong and then their daughter Margaret Jane Perry also married William Armstrong (my great great grandparents) .  There are several marriages between Armstrongs and Perrys.


Offline elainemarleneforbes

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #15 on: Jul 31, 2010, 07:56:02 AM »
Some was trying to find out the relationship between William Wilkinson and Thomas Perry.  I found some correspondence with a descendent which might be of interest.

He has been reviewing deeds and wills to try to determine the family relationships which seem to be complex. My understanding is that Wilkinson's instruments are inferior.  . 

He indicates that it is established from the probated will of James Perry the elder (also a well known instrument maker) that he left half of his estate to William Wilkinson.

This suggests that they were close family members 

Elizabeth Perry the son of Thomas Perry married William Wilkinson who was said to be her cousin.

This descendent believes that James  the elder's daughter Elizabeth married an Edward Wilkinson and they had a son William Wilkinson. Who is believed to be the William Wilkinson the violin maker who apprenticed to Thomas Perry and married his daughter Elizabeth.

He thinks James the elder might have been known as Jacques de Perriay or may have been the son of Jacques de Perriay.   There is a Claude de Perrieay who made cellos and we think he is also related but we don't know how.  We think perhaps an uncle of Thomas and James.

Who was part of the same families seemes to be clear due to bequests in wills and land converyances but exactly how they are related is less clear.

Hope this is of interest.  It interests us because of how deep the tradtion was in the family

Offline MM

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #16 on: Aug 01, 2010, 02:25:27 AM »
Oh thank you very much, ElaineMarlene!  It's very kind of you to take this much trouble and share all of this information.  Believe me, it is all very interesting.  Good luck to you in your ongoing search on your family history.  I have a couple of "academic" type documents on Thomas Perry in Dublin that I'll try to send to you under a separate email since I don't want to clutter up the forum.

Offline elainemarleneforbes

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #17 on: Aug 01, 2010, 04:56:52 AM »
i tried to send a message with my email address. I hope it went through I found the screen a little confusing

Offline coolbreeze

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #18 on: Aug 17, 2010, 12:55:52 AM »
Hi i am currently fixing a 10 string violin made by Thomas Perry i do believe. It is for a client, I have a concern i am hoping to get some input on i am a machinist not a violin expert. there is one difference that is trivial but i have noticed the brand on this one is below the neck? I seen others stating there brands are above the button.
the main concern is i am not actually completely copying there design but i am staying true to there working geometry as much as possible. I am rebuilding the tuning head.
i have noticed one big difference, the gears on this one seem to be reversed. In reversed i am trying to state the tuning key is below the string post. In all pictures i have seen the opposite is what i have seen. Some of the pictures have the same design head but from a different maker, did they out source?
i am posting a picture with one side of what was there looked like. I have noticed someone has worked on the tuning head prior to my attempt at  this. so it may not be original configuration.
So I am concerned should I reverse it to really keep true to the design?



Offline elainemarleneforbes

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #19 on: Aug 17, 2010, 02:23:27 AM »
 What does the brand look like on the  ten string?

Offline coolbreeze

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #20 on: Aug 20, 2010, 09:52:35 PM »
hi not sure if i am doing this right, i am new to this.
I am posting a pic of the brand, i have been told there are not many of these at all. i was also told the maker was more famous for guitars. I am wondering now if it is from another in the same family . i do know it is supposed to be around 300 years old which is a little older than T Perry would have done?
thank you for your input i am really enjoying this project .

Offline elainemarleneforbes

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #21 on: Aug 21, 2010, 02:14:38 AM »
The mark is very interesting if the instrument is that old.  From what I have heard, I don't think it would be a full 300 years old but it could be 250 years.  I believe this Perry family was making instruments from about 1750

I believe that Thomas Perry's father also Thomas Perry who died in 1771 was also a instrument maker.  James Perry the Elder who died in 1789 I believe was the famous Thomas perry's uncle.

Someone was asking earlier about the relationship of the Perrys and William Wilkinson.  The Wilkinsons and Perrys were very inter related

I just today received an email from a cousin Mike Cowan who  is researching the family from deeds from the period (I just compile what other people tell me) He said

"So Thomas Perry Jr. [We refer to the famous Thomas Perry as Jr.]and the Elizabeth Perry that married Edward Wilkinson would have been first cousins, their children William Wilkinson and Thomas's eldest daughter Elizabeth were first cousins once removed. So this means James the Elder was the father of Elizabeth Perry that married Edward Wilkinson, and Thomas Jr. and John b. 1752 were her first cousins, because their father was Thomas sr., also there is no mention of William Wilkinson being the nephew of Thomas Jr.,which would be the case if Elizabeth Perry was his sister. Plus it makes sense that Elizabeth was the daughter of James the Elder because James the Elder left Edward Wilkinson her husband half the land and the other half to James the younger."

Offline coolbreeze

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #22 on: Aug 21, 2010, 06:47:19 AM »
thank you for your information, if i get anything i will pass it to you for sure. I have not meet the owner of this violin it is a third party deal, when i do i will get all i can from him as well. I cant wait to hear him play this awesome instrument, that is my payment more than anything else for this job. I have loved music from a very young age, my first experience was around three my neighbor played in a blue grass band, yes the fiddle. He would keep me and we would listen to Les Paul albums, it was the 60's. I am a drummer, but i still love the blue grass style a lot. Oh also i was told that there are only 5 of these in the world, it maybe a little overdone but He is very credible (he is a maker from England with a degree in the art  ) ? there as well is a lot of ivory on this one to. the back peice and fingerboard are both ivory, the back peice is very detailed. i have not seen that from any pictures i have seen from that period. I will try to set up and take a nice picture of it for you this weekend. Good luck on finding your family tree, it is fun just searching and meeting new friends.

Offline elainemarleneforbes

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #23 on: Aug 22, 2010, 01:28:45 AM »
Look forward to the picture. (I like bluegrass as well)

The lavish detail on the instrument, from what I have heard is consistent with the Perry family. (Anything worth doing is worth overdoing!) 


Offline coolbreeze

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Re: Thomas Perry - Dublin violin maker in the 18th century
« Reply #24 on: Sep 08, 2010, 10:00:59 PM »
hey sorry for the lag time my laptop died and i use it to do my work so i have been busy getting all back in order. there is a id inside the violin it reads-made by perry ; Christ church yard ; Dublin  1769. the first line has more i just cant make it out. I will still get a picture up here again sorry i havent forgot you i have just been incredibly busy.
« Last Edit: Oct 09, 2010, 03:57:29 PM by coolbreeze »

 




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