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Author Topic: how much difference... (rosin)  (Read 2094 times)

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Offline raindr0ps

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how much difference... (rosin)
« on: Jun 14, 2009, 05:31:28 PM »
how much difference does the quality of rosin make?

I'm getting a new violin case off line, and I figured I might as well throw in some new rosin since, after 3+ years, mine's finally running out.

I'm see that there's light and dark rosin... And it looks like you can get rosin in soft, medium, and hard. What's the difference? What which do you prefer?

And then there's the cheaper ones that say they're "student grade" and the more expensive ones. Does any of this matter?

Even though I've been playing for a few years, I'm kinda still quite new to this whole thing. So, educate me! What's your favs?

Offline Joe Gerardi

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Re: how much difference... (rosin)
« Reply #1 on: Jun 14, 2009, 05:57:47 PM »
Use the search function for rosin here: there's a wealth of information.

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Offline jenford

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Re: how much difference... (rosin)
« Reply #2 on: Jun 14, 2009, 08:00:56 PM »
Currently I'm using the salchow & sons outta NYC.  I tried some Jade and it was nice - the salchow seems good for dry and humid conditions which is sooo Philadelphia  :afro: (that's my hair today)

Offline jenford

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Re: how much difference... (rosin)
« Reply #3 on: Jun 14, 2009, 08:07:53 PM »
Oh and btw - that's the only rosin our bowmaker stocks in her shop of many bows :-)

Offline sreizes

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Re: how much difference... (rosin)
« Reply #4 on: Jun 15, 2009, 03:37:28 AM »
Salchow is what the shop I go to stocks also.  I've had good luck with it.

Offline frodopogo

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Re: how much difference... (rosin)
« Reply #5 on: Jun 29, 2009, 08:17:01 AM »
Dark is generally grabbier than light within the same brand.

Greater grabbiness seems to be something more advanced players can exploit to good advantage, but it gets beginners into squawking more.
So what rosin works is somewhat dependent on your level of playing.
It's also dependent on your string brand and tension.
Stiffer strings require more grab to sound cleanly,
softer more flexible strings need less grab.

One quality that is nice to have in rosin is smoothness.
Until I found Kaplan Premium Light, I hadn't found a rosin that was both grabby and smooth, but that rosin manages to combine those qualities.
But you don't want to overuse it.

Offline Jansberg

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Re: how much difference... (rosin)
« Reply #6 on: Jun 29, 2009, 10:10:05 AM »
I use Bernadel - which has a nice balance in stickines and smothness..

Quote
Stiffer strings require more grab to sound cleanly,
softer more flexible strings need less grab.

is'nt that contradictionary to:

Quote
Greater grabbiness seems to be something more advanced players can exploit to good advantage, but it gets beginners into squawking more.

I mean most beginners use a stiffer string (like steel) because it is easier to get sound from - and you say stiffer string require more grab?

www.jansberg.blogspot.com - my blog about pickups, microphones, amplifiers and other gear for fiddles

Offline EricHill

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Re: how much difference... (rosin)
« Reply #7 on: Aug 07, 2009, 07:59:06 AM »
well supposedly you're supposed to choose the kind of rosin depending on the climate conditions of where you live. Light rosin is for warmer areas and dark is for colder areas. I've never been sure if this is actually fact or fiction

Offline frodopogo

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Re: how much difference... (rosin)
« Reply #8 on: Aug 10, 2009, 01:49:26 PM »
Rather than focus on the terminology (dark, light, hard, soft)
I think it's more useful to focus on the playing characteristics,
which for me are grabbiness vs. smoothness.
The two properties seem to be hard to get in the same rosin.
The one that has come closest for me is Kaplan Premium Light,
but then I tweak it by adding a little Becker Dark over it- it adds even a bit more smoothness.

All this is best done by experimenting yourself, since no rosin operates alone- it's the interaction with your particular violin, strings of a particular type, bow and bow hair and your particular playing style.

One way to think of it is that between the squawk caused by too much pressure or friction, and the squeak caused by too little pressure or friction is a golden window or sweet spot of good tone.
Depending on the strings, bow, and bow hair, this window could be fairly large or very small.  Your talent enters in in that you have to develop the ability to stay within that window of good tone.  Rosin helps (to a point) by increasing that window in one direction or another or maybe even both.

I find when I have a good rosin/bow combination that that window is definitely bigger, and it helps my playing since instead of trying to play carefully to stay within a small window of good tone, I can play boldly and dynamically within a larger window.

 




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