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Author Topic: Solid body strings for specific types of music???  (Read 2609 times)

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Offline Varian

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Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« on: May 26, 2006, 02:44:01 PM »
Hey,

I've got my eye on a Jupiter Creek solid body mandolin, and I know exactly what I want to do with it. Blues/Rock.
What kind of strings would be recommeded for a good, tone and enough power to cut through guitar, keyboard, bass, sax, and drums? I like a bit of a bluesy tone, and it's a solid body, so what strings are a good recommendation?

Peace!
Steve

Offline pfiddlepat

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2006, 03:44:34 PM »
I just use electric guitar strings.  Took a bit of experimenting to find the right gage for each, but i am currently using 36 for the G, 24 for the D, 13 for the A, and 12 for the E.  They can all be bent fairly easily, unlike on an acoustic mandolin.  I dont have any specific brand that i like over others, just steel electric guitar strings.

Patrick

Offline Varian

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2006, 05:04:14 PM »
Aren't guitar strings a bit long?
It doesn't sound like a bad idea, they're just long...

Offline madmat

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2006, 06:09:20 PM »
I've got my eye on a Jupiter Creek solid body mandolin, and I know exactly what I want to do with it. Blues/Rock.
What kind of strings would be recommeded for a good, tone and enough power to cut through guitar, keyboard, bass, sax, and drums? I like a bit of a bluesy tone, and it's a solid body, so what strings are a good recommendation?
I'd just use the D'addarios:
http://elderly.com/accessories/items/J67.htm

If you get one of the Jupiter Creek Tele-shaped solid mandos, then you HAVE to use ball-end electric guitar strings of the proper gauge, as the thing strings though the back like a Tele with string ferrules behind the bridge. YOu just have to cut them to the proper length.
Not your mama, or Yo-yo Ma!

Offline Svento

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #4 on: May 26, 2006, 10:33:45 PM »
Aren't guitar strings a bit long?
It doesn't sound like a bad idea, they're just long...
Well... too short strings can be a problem. Too long strings however can be cut to the right length.
   By the way, I've tried e-guitar strings on my fiddle. Almost worked but it was difficult getting an even tone when amplified. Some of the strings made unwanted noises too. To find the right dimensions I looked on some packs of mandolin strings, then I bought flat wound guitar strings the same dimensions. I had to change some of them though to smaller dimensions. I recall the E string was too hard.

Offline Varian

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2006, 11:52:28 PM »
So just cutting them is fine? I guess I'm so used to wrapping up the whole string like on my violin that I thought that the strings would unwind or something weird like that... :-\

All right, so electric guitar, D'Addario's...

Offline madfiddler

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2006, 12:05:08 AM »
Mmmm, I tried eguitar e strings for a while on my acoutic since I was breaking so many violin strings.. They lasted even less, so went back to violin strings...
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Offline Varian

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2006, 03:07:29 AM »
That's odd...

So, what kind of E guitar strings do you use?

Offline pfiddlepat

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2006, 02:59:21 AM »
I just use whatever strings brookdale music happens to have available in the "buy one string at a time" bin.  Currently, i think i have gibson strings on mine.  What kind of mando are you thinking about?  Just the simple tele shape, or some kind of custom shape?  What kind of wood?  I really like the tasmanian blackwood he uses on some (including mine!).

Offline transport

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #9 on: May 30, 2006, 07:55:14 AM »
I just use whatever strings brookdale music happens to have available in the "buy one string at a time" bin.  Currently, i think i have gibson strings on mine.  What kind of mando are you thinking about?  Just the simple tele shape, or some kind of custom shape?  What kind of wood?  I really like the tasmanian blackwood he uses on some (including mine!).

Some of the Tassy Blackwood can have beautiful fiddleback/flame to it, does yours?

Offline Varian

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2006, 03:03:49 PM »
I'm ordering a mandolin with a previously made custom shape. It's based on the "Red Special" guitar from whoever. It's the Red Special body with strat style headstock, two pickups w/ selector switch and Rosewood fretboard. Here are some images, though scattered, they'll give you an idea of what I am ordering.

This first one is of the Red Special body style:



This is the Strat style headstock:



That's what I'm ordering. I can feel the coolness in my bones! ;)

Offline madmat

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2006, 03:12:38 PM »
It's based on the "Red Special" guitar from whoever...
Queen guitarist Brian May and his father built the original "Red Special", there are lots of folks making copies these days. ;)
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Offline Svento

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #12 on: Jun 01, 2006, 09:13:54 AM »
May's original instrument also had a vibrato arm made out of the kick start from a moped. The mandolin seems to be missing this particular feature...
   But do you mean you're ordering a RS mandolin with a Fender style head? Why? The original one looks so right on that instrument.
   By the way: is it a bolted-on maple neck?

Offline Varian

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #13 on: Jun 01, 2006, 05:46:03 PM »
I do believe it's a bolted on neck.

As for the headstock, nothing is set in stone at this point. It's entirely possible that I could change my mind at any second. I've thought the same thing. My original plan was a normal body (tele style) with that finish and Fender headstock, but the guy thought that I wanted that particular body style. When he told me that he would make it, no extra charge, I jumped on it without thinking about the headstock, so it stayed. :-\
But your right, I just might have to go with that one; it does look right, after all...

Offline Varian

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #14 on: Jun 01, 2006, 05:48:04 PM »
I do believe it's a bolted on neck.

As for the headstock, nothing is set in stone at this point. It's entirely possible that I could change my mind at any second. I've thought the same thing. My original plan was a normal body (tele style) with that finish and Fender headstock, but the guy thought that I wanted that particular body style. When he told me that he would make it, no extra charge, I jumped on it without thinking about the headstock, so it stayed. :-\
But your right, I just might have to go with that one; it does look right, after all...

I guess what I'm saying is that I all things are still considered. I could, and most likely will, change my mind at more than one point. ;)

Offline madmat

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Re: Solid body strings for specific types of music???
« Reply #15 on: Jun 05, 2006, 08:28:03 PM »
I do believe it's a bolted on neck.
It is. Funny thing is, the neck heel plate is a 1/4 jack socket plate from a guitar... I was scratching my head for a bit as to why there was a big hole in the middle of it, when the light dawned... ;)

I'm a little annoyed at how much the single coil hums (honestly, that's also a big problem with the Epiphone Mandobird) so if I have another one built, or build one myself, I'll probably go to some kind of humbucker, like a Duncan Hot/Cool/Vintage Rails, or use both halves of a P-Bass pickup and wire it so it's humbucking, with a series/parallel switch for tonal variation. The strings weren't grounded, so I did add a ground wire with the resistor and cap so I don't zap myself (although that's not a risk with the battery-powered Microcube or Vox DA-5).

I'd also re-locate the volume and tone controls to the upper bout (where the pickup switch is on a Les Paul) with a single coaxial pot so violent strumming and palm muting are possible, they get in the way, and are too closely spaced as it comes to you. I'd also move the jack to the side, so the top is clean.

Other than that, I'm really pretty happy with the thing, the sound is quite unlike a guitar way up on the fingerboard, it's got a lovely "tinkly" sound, especially through a chorus pedal, and it really snarls on the distortion amp models. And yes, you can instantly play every tune you know on violin with it, with pretty-close-to-perfect intonation! :)

A twin-neck with one tuned to uke tuning (perhaps an 8-string neck) for chords, and the other to mando tuning for solos, would be the ultimate weapon.
Not your mama, or Yo-yo Ma!

 




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